Cathie Montanez

  • Lake Forest, CA
PUBLIC PROFILE

How is Alumina Ceramic Parts Manufactured?

Posted by Cathie Montanez on September 19, 2019 5:45 AM EDT
Cathie  Montanez photo

Alumina ceramic products are formed by various methods including dry pressing, grouting, extrusion, cold isostatic pressing, injection, casting, hot pressing, and hot isostatic pressing.

Alumina is a ceramic material with high thermal conductivity, compressive strength, and thermal shock resistance. It also has a low thermal expansion, making it a suitable material for furnace use in the crucible, tube, and thermocouple sheath form. Alumina has high hardness and good wear resistance, making it a suitable material for ball valves, piston pumps, and deep drawing tools. In addition, it can be easily combined with metals and other ceramic materials using brazing techniques and metalizing.

What is the production process of alumina ceramics? Alumina ceramic products are formed by various methods including dry pressing, grouting, extrusion, cold isostatic pressing, injection, casting, hot pressing, and hot isostatic pressing.

The production process of alumina ceramics is generally divided into three main steps. To ensure its quality, every step must be done. The first is the preparation of ceramic powder as a raw material. If you make general-purpose ceramic porcelain, there are ready-made spray-dried granulated powders on the market; if you need to control the formulation of your own materials, you need to buy ball mills and balls as well as spray dryers. For sheet products less than 2 mm, gelation molding can be considered; for ceramics larger than 2 mm, it can be considered to be formed by press pressing.

At present, alumina ceramics can be mainly used for protection tubes and insulating tubes of thermocouple thermometers for temperature measuring instruments; it can also be used in furnace tubes of industrial resistance furnaces, experimental electric furnaces and heat treatment furnaces. Alumina ceramic plates can withstand high temperature and maintain high strength and hardness. Alumina plates also have superb performances in electrical insulation, high chemical resistance, and low thermal expansion.

Stanford Advanced Materials provide alumina custom parts with a wide range of sizes and alumina purity grades. We accept drawings, samples and even photos for the alumina parts you require. Please visit https://www.samaterials.com/ for more information.

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